Concussion Facts

WHAT ACTUALLY HAPPENS WHEN A CONCUSSION IS SUSTAINED?

When a person suffers a concussion, the brain shifts inside the skull and can collide with the skull’s bony surface. This results in a temporary disruption of energy utilization in the brain. There may be no direct trauma to the head and the concussed athlete often remains conscious. In fact, 4 out of 5 professional athletes do not even know that they have been concussed (Delaney et al, CJSM 2001). A concussion is not typically a visible injury, so it is important to share information regarding symptoms with your family and health care providers. After a concussion, the brain becomes more vulnerable to the effects of subsequent injury, which may result in more severe problems.

WHAT ARE THE SYMTOMS OF A CONCUSSION?

  • Nausea with or without vomiting
  • Headache or feeling of pressure in the head
  • Confusion, disorientation or amnesia
  • Feeling mentally slowed down or “foggy”
  • Dizziness
  • Sensitivity to light or sound
  • Clumsiness / balance disruption

WHEN SHOULD I GO TO THE HOSPITAL?

  • Loss of consciousness
  • Severe headache that continues to increase in intensity
  • Pronounced decline in mental status in the minutes to hours following injury
  • Sensory or motor loss in the limbs

WHAT TO DO AFTER A CONCUSSION:

  • Rest and monitor symptoms for warning signs below
  • Avoid bright lights, loud noise, electronics or focused activity such as reading
  • Avoid alcohol or drugs not prescribed by a doctor
  • Book a post-concussion Assessment

If you have sustained a concussion, please contact our reception staff at (780)430-9224 to book a Concussion Assessment.

For more information, contact our Concussion team:

Nic Allen, Concussion Program Coordinator; nicolasa@rivervalleyhealth.com
Mike Saunders, Concussion Program Assistant & Vision Training Lead; mikes@rivervalleyhealth.com